Monthly Archives: November 2014

The #GetItDowntown Experience



One of Maryland’s largest Main Streets, Downtown Frederick provides residents and visitors alike with the opportunity to support their neighborhood while enjoying a charming, authentic experience just outside the nation’s capital. With great activities, history-lined streets and a vibrant atmosphere year-round, it is no wonder that Downtown Frederick is a popular place to shop during the holiday season. With featuring more than 150 unique shops and 40 tasty restaurants (many of which have earned national acclaim), you can be sure to find something for everyone in Downtown Frederick. Frosty Friday (11/28) and Small Business Saturday (11/29) are sure to be a blast with great Downtown Doorbuster Bag Giveaways, fun activities and holiday cheer for the whole family. And with our celebrated Three Saturdays in December – featuring live music, late shopping hours, fantastic dining and gallery openings – your Downtown Frederick holiday shopping experience is guaranteed to be a vibrant memory shared with friends and family.

Photo by Kenneth Garrett. Copyright Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership

Photo by Kenneth Garrett. Copyright Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership

Visitors to Downtown Frederick also can use hashtags to share their holiday shopping experience: Downtown Frederick Partnership is promoting #GetItDowntown and #DowntownFrederick as an opportunity to connect with local businesses and your fellow Shop Small supporters. Here at the Partnership, we are confident that together we can make a real economic impact by joining the #ShopSmall movement and supporting our local businesses on #SmallBusinessSaturday.

Why #ShopSmall?

In addition to supporting local business owners (many of whom may be friends, family and neighbors), Downtown Frederick boasts plenty of reasons to join the Shop Small and Small Business Saturday movements. The economic impact of shopping locally has been shown time and time again, with studies indicating that as much as $.48 of every dollar recirculates locally when spent at a small business (as opposed to $.14 of every dollar spent at a chain store). Research also shows that small businesses, in general, return more money to their local community than their corporate competitors.

Beyond the national data, Downtown Frederick Partnership has identified five great reasons to Get It Downtown:

WHAT’S SPENT HERE STAYS HERE – Get it in Downtown Frederick and more of your money is reinvested in the local economy instead of corporate offices in distant cities. Shop at a national chain and very little of your money stays local. Buy online and your local economy rarely gets a dime.

WE KNOW OUR STUFF – Downtown Frederick business owners are passionate about what we do. We sell what you want—not what corporate headquarters tell us you should buy. We spend time in our shops and restaurants, making sure our customers are well cared for.

LOCAL BUSINESSES MAKE GOOD NEIGHBORS – Just like you, we care about our community and the people who live here. That’s why Downtown Frederick businesses give back in a big way, supporting nonprofits, sports teams, schools and other organizations that make our community great.

IT’S THE GREEN THING TO DO – Our walkable downtown means less driving for you and more energy saved. Small businesses tend to be greener by nature, engaging in eco-friendly practices and shopping local for goods and services. We want to preserve our city and our earth.

THERE’S ONLY ONE DOWNTOWN FREDERICK – With our one-of-a-kind specialty shops and restaurants, Downtown Frederick stands out in a sea of “clone towns.” We have a personality all our own… friendly, vibrant, eclectic and thriving. With your help, we’ll keep it that way.

Downtown Frederick Partnership works to enhance, promote, and preserve the vitality and economic viability of Downtown Frederick by implementing the national Main Street Program for the benefit of Frederick businesses, residents and visitors.

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National Teacher Seminar Scheduled in Middleburg



In collaboration with Ancestry, and its affiliates Fold3.com and AncestryK12.com, the Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership is inviting teachers to participate in a professional development seminar on how to engage students in a service-learning program using primary source-based research.  This service-learning program introduces students to primary source documents as they examine fallen Civil War soldiers from their own communities. By learning about these men, history—both local and national—comes alive for the participating researchers. As they get to know “their” soldier, students make connections between their lives and those that came before them, ultimately allowing them to understand that this war impacted every single American.

Ancestry Senior Executive Brock Bierman and JTHG President Cate Magennis Wyatt sign a partnership agreement during a tree planting ceremony at Gettysburg National Military Park on November 19, 2013.

Ancestry Senior Executive Brock Bierman and JTHG President Cate Magennis Wyatt sign a partnership agreement during a tree planting ceremony at Gettysburg National Military Park on November 19, 2013.

Once completed, the research is used for the Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership’s Living Legacy Tree Planting Project, an initiative with the goal of planting one tree for each of the 620,000 fallen Civil War soldiers, becoming the first national memorial for the most defining time in our nation’s history.  Students around the country are already conducting research on the individual lives of these soldiers, which are then uploaded and shared through an online, interactive map. This map indentifies every tree planted through a geotag, which allows visitors the opportunity to learn the name and story of the young man for whom the tree is planted, with photos, diary entries, and letters home also shared.  To date, over 300 students in Virginia, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and Vermont have collected information on over 800 soldiers. Additionally, over 5,000 facts, images, and stories have been uploaded to the Honor Wall pages hosted by Ancestry.com’s affiliate site, Fold3.com.

The Living Legacy Teacher Seminar will be held 10:00-4:00 p.m. on December 7-8 at the National Sporting Library & Museum in Middleburg.  This free, two-day professional development seminar is being offered to any educator interested in bringing this groundbreaking curriculum and service-learning project to their students. Throughout this program, participating educators will receive in-depth training in genealogy research as led byAncestry.com experts and participate in stimulating discussion on the role, value, and implementation of service-learning curriculum.  Participants will also be the first to see, and provide feedback, on a new curriculum being developed, known as Living Legacy Tree Planting Project: A Teacher’s Guide to Engaging Students with the National Civil War Memorial, which will connect the social sciences to language arts, STEM, and GIS (geographic information system) standards of learning.

Attending teachers will receive a $350 stipend in return for their time and to help defray any travel and accommodation expenses.  Lunch will also be provided both days.  In return, all participating educators must commit to incorporating portions of the Living Legacy curriculum into their classrooms before the end of the current school year.

Two other teacher seminars have been held to date, including one hosted at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, which brought teachers together with industry leaders such as the Virginia Geographic Alliance and ESRI.  A second teacher seminar was held at Manassas National Battlefield in partnership with Ancestry.com experts.  The goal of the third seminar, which is funded in part by a grant from Ancestry, is to identify and train 30 teachers that will be able to engage an additional 2,000 students across the country.

National Sporting Library & Museum, courtesy of Visit Loudoun

National Sporting Library & Museum, courtesy of Visit Loudoun

The National Sporting Library & Museum, located within the heart of the Journey Through Hallowed Ground National Heritage Area, is conveniently located 20 miles from Dulles International Airport in Middleburg, Va.  To learn more about the National Sporting Library & Museum, visit www.nsl.org.  Teachers interested in registering for the seminar can visit www.hallowedground.org.

Celebrating 100 Years With Virginia’s Department of Forestry



When the colonists first arrived in Jamestown in 1607, Virginia was a land of vast forests.  And one of the first “products” shipped back to England was timber harvested from the land surrounding the settlement.  The Cherrybark Oak trees on Jamestown Island were excellent sources of lumber and wooden shingles that were desperately needed by the people of a growing city (London).  Over the course of the next 300 years, much of the forestland in Virginia was harvested to build homes in the “New World,” create sailing ships and to clear land for agricultural purposes.  Little, if any, replanting of trees was performed.

The Virginia Department of Forestry was created by Gov. Henry Stuart and the General Assembly in March of 1914.  Formed under the state Geologic Commission, the agency was charged with the suppression of wildfires and the reforestation of a nearly denuded Virginia – two core missions that still exist today.  Over the past 100 years, Virginia Department of Forestry employees have battled 150,000 wildfires that have burned more than 3 million acres of forestland, and they’ve grown and planted more than 2 billion trees.

Photo by Kenneth Garrett. Copyright Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership

Photo by Kenneth Garrett. Copyright Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership

Chapin Jones began work March 1, 1915 as the State Forester of Virginia.  He was not just the first employee at the new agency, he was the only employee.  He began his tenure by creating a series of informational posters designed to educate the citizenry on the dangers of wildfire and the importance of preventing them in the first place.  He expanded his duties the following year when he developed a tree nursery on land near the University of Virginia.  After “going it alone” for several years, he was able to hire a handful of people to help fight wildfires in the western portion of the state.  Over the next several decades, the VDOF grew slowly and steadily.  One nursery expanded to two, then to three, as the need for more tree seedlings grew.  The agency now has two nurseries – one in Sussex County that grows 27 million pine seedlings each year, and one in Augusta County that grows about 3 million hardwood seedlings annually.

While battling wildfires and reforestation work remain core functions, VDOF is also responsible for the quality of water through its efforts to ensure that timber harvest operations do not add sediment to streams, creeks and rivers.  The agency is also working hard to conserve forested landscapes and ensure working forests remain working forestlands.  Seven years ago, VDOF launched its Forestland Conservation Division.  In these few short years, the division has secured more than 100 conservation easements (legal agreements that forever protect the land from development while still being the property of the private owner of the land) that cover more than 30,000 acres of forestland.  VDOF also provides unbiased, scientifically-based forest management recommendations to ensure the 373,600 private forest landowners in Virginia meet their goals and objectives they have for their land.  The Virginia Department of Forestry oversees 24 State Forests that serve a number of purposes: timber resource, recreational opportunities (hiking, biking, fishing, hunting, horseback riding), ecosystem services (clean air and water), and aesthetics.  The forests range in size from just over 100 acres to nearly 20,000 acres and are located in most areas of Virginia.

To mark the 100th anniversary of the Virginia Department of Forestry, the agency has conducted a number of special events throughout the year.  These include partnering with the Virginia Lottery on a scratch-off game; working with the Virginia Department of Transportation to focus the content of the 2014-2016 state road map on the agency and its State Forests; an exhibit of VDOF firefighting vehicles at the Virginia Museum of Transportation; an exhibition of original paintings of Smokey Bear by artist Rudy Wendelin at The Chrysler Museum of Art; displays at four NASCAR race tracks, and participation in a number of parades and the State Fair of Virginia.

Photo by Kenneth Garrett. Copyright Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership

Photo by Kenneth Garrett. Copyright Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership

As we near the end of the centennial year, the leaves are changing color and turning the vistas into sweeping palettes of scarlet, crimson and gold.  We encourage you to take a drive this month to enjoy this annual event.  There are ample opportunities to check out the beautiful fall foliage along the Journey Through Hallowed Ground National Scenic Byway.  You can learn more about peak periods and other information at www.dof.virginia.gov.  All of us at the Virginia Department of Forestry look forward to a second century of protecting and serving the citizens of the Commonwealth.