The 30th Anniversary of the National Heritage Area Program



Sunday, August 24th marked the 30th creation of the Illinois & Michigan Canal National Heritage Corridor, which was signed into law by President Reagan in 1984.

Photo by Kenneth Garrett. Copyright Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership.

Photo by Kenneth Garrett. Copyright Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership.

The National Heritage Area (NHA) Program serves as a public-private partnership for the stories that are too large, or perhaps too complicated, for the National Park Service to tell. Take The Journey Through Hallowed Ground National Heritage Area for example, which was created as the 38th Area in the country and signed into law by President Bush in 2008. Within this 180-mile swath of land, we can tell more stories than any single park would be able to by linking several parks and the surrounding communities together and filling in the gaps in interpretation with inclusive stories about those who have lived here and helped shape the American (and local) character. We can tell a large portion of the story of the Civil War, but we also link nine Presidential sites, portions of the Underground Railroad, and the house where the Marshall Plan was written, to name just a few. Each of these sites are important in their own right, but together, they create a rich fabric that helps visitors and locals alike understand the unique history of this region.

Photo by Kenneth Garrett. Copyright Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership.

Photo by Kenneth Garrett. Copyright Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership.

The National Heritage Area designation is founded on two core principals – heritage tourism and education, both of which are essential to our organization’s mission. Through immersive, award-winning educational programs, we reach students of all ages to create future stewards of these national treasures. Through the Certified Tourism Ambassador Training program, we train frontline hospitality workers to turn ordinary visitor experiences into something truly extraordinary.

Although the federal budget for the NHA program has been cut over the years, it is obvious that this is still a program the public supports – it offers a solution to communities who see a need for preservation to work together and feel a sense of ownership over an important landscape. Each of the 49 National Heritage Areas currently in existence tells some portion of our American story, which is what the National Heritage Area program is all about: nationally significant large landscapes that are still living, breathing pieces of Americana.

Photo by Kenneth Garrett. Copyright Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership.

Photo by Kenneth Garrett. Copyright Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership.

The 30 years since the first National Heritage Area was designated have given us a lot to be thankful for – most especially that these regions are receiving recognition and now have a hope of being preserved for our children, and our children’s children. As the budget cuts loom again and more NHA’s are being designated, it is also important to look at how we are growing as a group. It is clear the program still has a lot to do to ensure the models we are creating for the program today are sustainable for the National Heritage Areas of the future.

 

Michelle Kellogg

Michelle Kellogg

Director of JTHG National Heritage Area at Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership
Michelle Kellogg holds a B.A. in Art History from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and a Master’s degree in Museum and Gallery Studies from the University of St Andrews, Scotland, where her dissertation focused on sustainability in museum collections care. While working toward her degree, Michelle completed an internship with the National Trust for Scotland at Hill of Tarvit Mansion House where she wrote eight guidebooks to train volunteers at the home. From 2010 to 2013, Michelle served as the Production Manager at the Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership, where she managed merchandising, served as the administrator for the CTA hospitality training course, and assisted with event planning.

In 2013, she was promoted to the Director of Regional and Strategic Partnerships. In this capacity, she worked closely with JTHG partners to plan annual awareness and fundraising events. In 2014, Michelle was promoted to Director of JTHG National Heritage Area.
Michelle Kellogg

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Michelle Kellogg

About Michelle Kellogg

Michelle Kellogg holds a B.A. in Art History from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and a Master’s degree in Museum and Gallery Studies from the University of St Andrews, Scotland, where her dissertation focused on sustainability in museum collections care. While working toward her degree, Michelle completed an internship with the National Trust for Scotland at Hill of Tarvit Mansion House where she wrote eight guidebooks to train volunteers at the home. From 2010 to 2013, Michelle served as the Production Manager at the Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership, where she managed merchandising, served as the administrator for the CTA hospitality training course, and assisted with event planning. In 2013, she was promoted to the Director of Regional and Strategic Partnerships. In this capacity, she worked closely with JTHG partners to plan annual awareness and fundraising events. In 2014, Michelle was promoted to Director of JTHG National Heritage Area.